STR 1.1 (Winter 2010)

In this issue the theme is reading the OT theologically.

Abstract: This essay explores questions and concerns relevant to the interpretation of the Psalms. This portion of Scripture has, of course, enjoyed a long and vibrant history of analysis and scholarly interest in addition to being held in high esteem in the life and liturgy of the church. Among the debates that swirl around this collection of inspired poetry is the extent to which we can or should assign historical settings. To what degree do such determinations help or hinder the contemporary believer in appropriating and applying them? Part of what fuels this discussion is a growing desire to read the Psalms theologically and canonically. Is there evidence that the Psalms have been purposely positioned in the order we now have them? This essay guides the reader through these matters.

Abstract: This essay presents a unique approach to understanding the theological outlook of the book of Esther. This somewhat enigmatic book has caused not a few to wonder at its inclusion in the canon of Scripture. Why should a book that does not mention God be incorporated into the Bible? To this question Firth challenges the reader to think about the narrative strategy of Esther and, additionally, to the intertextual links with the books of Samuel. The grounds for following these well worn hermeneutical tenets is persuasively expounded and helpfully explained to help elucidate the theology of Esther.

Abstract: This essay presents a unique approach to understanding the theological outlook of the book of Esther. This somewhat enigmatic book has caused not a few to wonder at its inclusion in the canon of Scripture. Why should a book that does not mention God be incorporated into the Bible? To this question Firth challenges the reader to think about the narrative strategy of Esther and, additionally, to the intertextual links with the books of Samuel. The grounds for following these well worn hermeneutical tenets is persuasively expounded and helpfully explained to help elucidate the theology of Esther.

Abstract: This essay explores the OT background to the opening chapters of Acts. The relationship between Acts 1–4 and especially Acts 2 to parts of the OT has been studied before, but this essay suggests Deuteronomy 14–16 as an essential part of the OT foundation for Luke’s narrative. The Sabbath and festival laws contained in that portion of the Pentateuch provide a theological context against which the birth of the church as well as implications for its nature and character are more clearly appreciated. Not only does this article challenge thinking about intertextuality, but it also forces the reader to carefully consider what Jesus meant when he said that he did not come to abolish the law but to fulfill it.

The volume concludes with a series of book reviews.